Food & Health - Bone Broth


It seems there is a new diet or exercise fad born every week. It can be downright exhausting to filter through the abundance of information on any given topic of interest let alone make a decision about anything.


Collagen and bone broth have been getting a lot of attention, and I receive many questions about these two things in particular. Better skin, healthy hair, and fabulous nails, anyone?


Bone broth possesses many health-supporting benefits that go beyond vanity. Bone and joint health, gut health, cardiovascular health, brain health, and the list goes on. Bone broth is rich in minerals, amino acids, and collagen.


Our grandmothers were right to use every last bit of an animal, especially the bones. That generation should have coined the term nose-to-tail eating rather than the modern-day Paleo innovators! Bone broth is not a new concept; however, the pre-made processed versions are.


I have a food-first philosophy, and do not jump on the latest and greatest supplements as a first-line approach. Instead, I look to food habits and identify adjustments to optimize an individual’s health strategy.


Bone broth is a healthy addition to most food strategies, although vegans may disagree. I consider it a superfood because it is a nutrient-rich goldmine.

Some people do not like the jelly consistency. Rest assured that consistency is the result of collagen and gelatin. It is all good and will liquify when heated.

Bone broth is a great way to boost the nutritional value of soups, stews, and sauces. This is especially helpful when dealing with fussy eaters.


The following recipe dates back to when my grandmother was young. This is tried and true. Choose clean ingredients. Only use organic vegetables and grass-fed meat. It’s important to know the source of your meat.


This recipe is also featured in my book Mastering the Health Continuum: 8 Daily Practices to Boost Energy, Optimize Health and Age Gracefully. Enjoy!



Bone Broth

  • 2 pounds of Beef Femur Bones

  • 1 pound of Oxtails

  • 1 Onion

  • 1 Fennel Bulb

  • 3 Carrots

  • 4 Garlic Cloves

  • 4 Celery Stalks

  • Bunch of Italian Parsley

  • Fresh Thyme

  • Fresh Rosemary

  • Bay Leaf

  • Peppercorns

  • Salt

  • 2 Tablespoons of raw Apple Cider Vinegar

  • Olive Oil


Drizzle Olive Oil over the bones and roast them in your oven at four hundred degrees for thirty minutes. Add everything to a slow cooker and cover with water. Run two ten-hour cooking cycles. Strain out any solids.


Enjoy a warm cup of bone broth periodically to help support your gut health. Add to soups in place of stock. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.


As an alternative, you can use leftover poultry carcasses, generally two chicken or one turkey.


Need more Nancy in your life? Connect with her a nancy@drnancymiggins.com & www.drnancymiggins.com


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